Sweet & Spicy Wings

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Wings are great. Want to know why? Because you can do whatever the hell you want to them. They’re incredibly versatile. I actually saw an article today about “wings around the world.” It’s amazing the variety of things you can do to them.

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Of course, along with the variety of flavors you can create to suit wings, there are also a variety of ways to cook them. Grill, bake, “oven fry,” and the best for last, actually frying them.

Today, due to boredom, I thought, “Let’s concoct some wing recipe for the blog.” And this is what I got:

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Ingredients:

Clean and cut wings (amount varying on # of people. I average 6-8 wings per person)
4 cloves garlic (1/2 for crushing, 1/2 sliced thin)
1 large ginger
1 lime
1 jalapeno, sliced thin
1 teaspoon fish sauce
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon vinegar
3/4 cup tapioca starch (this was for about 12 wings)
lots of ground pepper

1. Clean your wings thoroughly. Place into a large bowl.
2. Take 2 cloves of garlic and crush them into the large bowl.
3. Add 1 tablespoon of crushed ginger (I used my garlic press for both ginger and garlic).
4. Squeeze 1/2 lime into the bowl and add fish sauce.
5. Add 1/4 cup of the brown sugar and mix thoroughly. Let sit for at least 30 minutes.
6. Meanwhile, in a saucepan on medium heat, sauté the garlic and ginger slices.
7. Add the jalapeño and remaining brown sugar.
8. Add vinegar and let simmer for a few minutes. Set aside.
9. To your bowl of wings, add the tapioca starch and plenty of ground pepper. Mix thoroughly to make sure each wing is covered.
10. Fry as per usual.
11. Once done frying, toss your wings with the sauce and enjoy!

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Pizza !

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I love pizza. I seem to start off many of my posts like that…

Anyway, being from New Jersey, I’m spoiled by great pizza (and bagels). Pizza anywhere else has never, EVER tasted as good. And I’m pretty certain it’s not because of my huge pizza-ego. It’s just true.

To me, there’s two kinds of pizzas. The kind you get at the local pizzeria, made with regular shredded mozzarella you find in a store and the works. You eat it with a good amount of garlic powder and red chili flakes. But my favorite, oh boy, my favorite is the wood burning oven kind of pizza. The kind of pizza that has fresh mozzarella and crispy yet chewy dough, and you eat with a fork and knife. The kind where you almost die of happiness.

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I’ve had a fair share of terrible pizza. Especially having lived in San Diego, there just wasn’t anything close to what I had at home. Well there was one…somewhat decent but the crust had the texture of dried wood chips. I’ve had the pizza where the crust was so paper thin (and by the way, when we say paper thin pizza in New Jersey and New York, we don’t literally mean it), everything just absorbed through the crust and became soggy. I’ve also had the kind where the dough is so thick, it takes a few minutes to get through one bite. And of course, one of the worst offenders, is the terrible choices in cheese that I’ve seen. Far too rubbery, far too much, and my newest experience, far too goopy. It was weird. It was somewhat opaque and really runny. So strange.

So, with all that said, I have been making pizzas since high school. Primarily because I worked in an Italian bakery for several years and there was always an abundance of pizza dough.

The first few years were horrible. I made it, loud and proud, and would serve it to my family. The slight smiles and many pauses in how “good” it was made it clear that I had failed. Failure.

So I practiced and I practiced. I perfected my dough recipe and figured out the best techniques to have a perfect pizza.

Couple things: I highly suggest using a cast iron pizza pan. I do not like pizza stones. Maybe it’s because one of my friends sat on mine and it shattered, but regardless, I don’t think they’re as good as cast iron.

Fresh mozzarella can be tough to come by. So shredded mozzarella is okay…as long as you have explored at least the 100 mile radius around you for the fresh kind. Extreme? Yes. Makes sense? Of course.

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Sad Dog

You also want to blind bake the crust. Since I obviously (and most people) don’t have a wood burning oven, I blast my oven at 500 degrees F. But this also means the temperature can fluctuate greatly. So, in my many failures in the past, I would have not-done crust with burnt cheese on top. There were just many things that went wrong. So back to blind baking. By this, I mean roll out your crust and bake by itself on the pan for 3 minutes, take it out, and then put your toppings on. This gets the cooking process started on the crust so by the time you put it back in the oven, everything cooks evenly.

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Serves 4 people
Time: 3 hours

Ingredients:

Crust:

3 cups flour
1 packet yeast
1.5 cups hot water
1 tablespoon honey
1 tablespoon salt

1. Follow the directions for foccacia: https://kimchiandkogi.com/2014/07/20/rosemary-focaccia/; allow to rise for at least 1 hour, or until doubled in size.

Toppings:

3/4 cup diced grape tomatoes
1 cup diced fresh mozzarella
1 clove garlic, sliced thin
1/3 cup feta cheese
fresh basil

1. Clearly, you are welcome to use any toppings you would like.
2. P.S. remember my balsamic reduction from my chicken & peach sandwich? It is amazing with pizza.
3. Cut your dough into two pieces.
4. Take one piece and place on floured surface.
5. With your fingers, start to shape your dough into a 12 inch circle. You can also use a rolling pin; I just prefer using my fingers because the dough is very delicate at this point.
6. Carefully place onto your cast iron pan. I don’t have a pizza peel (it’s in New Jersey :() so I just fold my crust (very quickly!) into quarters and unfold it onto the pan. It’s an annoying procedure but the easiest.
7. Bake for 4 minutes and remove.
8. Put all of your toppings on your semi-baked crust. Return to the oven. At this point, I put the crust on a floured cutting board and then slide it back onto the pan when it has all of it’s toppings on.
9. Cook until golden brown and the cheese is melted.
10. Remove from oven and let cool for a few minutes before cutting.
11. Enjoy!

There are a few things that may happen:

1. Water from the mozzarella; I’ve seen this happen over and over. It’s hard to avoid because in reality, 500 degrees F isn’t the ideal heat. I have avoided this water by either letting the cut mozzarella drain on paper towel or cutting it very thin.
2. Crust is done but toppings aren’t; blast the broiler and watch carefully until done.
3. I ate too much. Answer? No surprise.

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Buttery Lemony Pound Cake

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Amidst my journey towards being wedding ready, I have cheat days. Well…pretty much everyday. I just can’t diet. I just can’t!

Although I do eat healthier, I still need a good dessert at the end of the day. Whether it’s chocolate, cookies, or cake, I just can’t resist. So upon buying a giant size pack of butter at Sam’s Club today, I thought “Let’s make pound cake!”

Pound cake is quite heavy. 2 sticks of butter, 4 eggs, 1 cup sugar, tons of flour. But I eat in moderation. It keeps me sane. It keeps me from incidents like that one time I cried because I couldn’t find the nail clipper. Yes, this happened for real.

This pound cake is great with whipped cream and macerated berries, so enjoy!

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Servings: 10-12 slices
Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

2 cups flour
4 eggs
2 sticks softened unsalted butter
1 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 teaspoon lemon zest

1. Cream your butter and sugar until light and fluffy and preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.
2. Add 1 egg at a time, mixing thoroughly in between (I used a hand mixer; standing mixer is always better, in my opinion).
3. Add vanilla and lemon zest. Mix to incorporate.
4. Mix your flour and salt; gradually add to butter mixture.
5. Continue to mix until just incorporated; don’t over mix.
6. Line your loaf pan with parchment paper; mine is nonstick so I don’t butter it but you are more than welcome to.
7. Pour your batter into the pan; it will be quite thick so don’t panic.
8. Carefully spread out the batter and smooth out the top (I promise, it will smooth out in the oven).
9. On the counter, tap your loaf pan to rid of any bubbles in the batter.
10. Place your pan in the oven and bake for 1 hour.

Once again, if you are using a smaller conventional oven, I suggest lowering the temperature just a tad and cover the top with foil for half the baking time so it doesn’t burn.

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TADA!

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King Mandu!

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Oh my GOD. I DID IT. This has to be one of my all time favorite Korean food, 왕만두. It essentially is a steam pork bun but it’s called “King” since they are so freakishly large. Many times, it’s referred to as Wang Mandu (cue innapropriosity) but I prefer not to call them that.

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It’s a savory, garlicky, juicy filling inside a puffy and chewy outer “bun.” This was was far easier to make than I thought it was going to be. With very basic ingredients, you’ll be eating this in no time!

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Prep time: 2 hours

Servings: 10 large buns

Ingredients:

Bun:

1 cup warm water (hot enough that you can stick your finger in but want to take it out)
1 packet yeast (approx. 2 teaspoons)
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2-3 cups all purpose flour

1. Place all ingredients except flour in a large bowl. Mix well. Let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes.
2. Take 2 cups of flour and mix into above bowl of ingredients.
3. As you mix, add more flour until dough starts pulling off from the sides and is not sticky.
4. Start kneading your dough on a clean surface, adding more flour as needed. Knead for 5 minutes.
5. Place in a bowl and cover with a towel or saran wrap. Let rise for 1 hour.
6. After 1 hour, knead your dough for 1 minute. Place back in bowl again for 30 minutes and begin making your filling.

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Filling:

1 pound fresh ground pork
1/2 onion, finely diced
1 cup finely chopped napa cabbage
2 stalks scallion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
1 tablespoon sugar
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon sesame oil
kosher salt

1. Take your chopped onion, cabbage, garlic, and scallions and place in a bowl. Sprinkle with kosher salt and mix. Let sit for 5 minutes.
2. Take your ground pork and in a bowl, add soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar, and ground pepper.
3. With your hand (deal with it), mix in one direction (I go clockwise) for 1 minute. The meat will bind together well.
4. Squeeze excess water out of your vegetables that have been covered in kosher salt. Place the squeezed vegetables in the bowl with pork.
5. Mix again (in the same direction) to combine thoroughly.

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Bun assembly:

1. Cut your dough into tennis ball sized pieces.
2. With a rolling pin, roll out your dough into a circle, about 7 inches wide.
3. Place 3 tablespoons of filling in the center and start pinching the edges together. Make sure it is completely sealed.
4. In a steamer, place a couple cups of water and on the rack, cover it with parchment paper (or use cupcake liners).
5. Place buns on the paper; make sure they are placed at least 1 inch apart. They will expand a LOT while cooking. I made that mistake today..
6. Let the buns sit (before steaming) for 20 minutes.
7. After 20 minutes, start steaming the buns over medium heat. Cook for 20 minutes.
8. Enjoy with soy sauce!

Extras:

1. I would definitely add fresh ground ginger to the filling; todays selection of ginger at Walmart looked like little pieces of dried cat poop.
2. You can definitely add some spice to this, using something like chili oil in the filling.
3. Any other vegetable would taste great in the filling, such as mushrooms, carrots, zucchini, mungbean sprouts, etc.

 

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They aren’t the prettiest things in the world. Honestly, they kind of look like used baby diapers. And do make you have garlic breath but it’s worth it. No one will want to talk to you but at least you have a steamed pork bun to eat.

 

Japanese Milk Bread

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I love bread. All kind of bread. I’m pretty sure I mentioned this not too long ago…

Bread is the one thing I refuse to give up in preparation to fit into my wedding dress. I’d rather run an extra 2 miles and eat all the bread I want rather than give it up.

From French bread to Italian foccacia bread to ciabatta, these are all great. But my all time favorite has to be asian bread. Whether its Japanese, Korean, or Chinese (or any other), the bread is just…different. It’s softer, has the perfect texture of chewiness among it’s fluffiness, and is just sweet enough that you won’t experience a sugar high from consumption.

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But from what I knew from research in the past, this type of bread is not the easiest. It’s stringy texture is the hardest to accomplish, rather than just simple airy or dense bread. This isn’t the easiest recipe to take on, but it’s definitely worth the extra work.

So, let’s move onto the technical aspects of this recipe. Tangzhong. What did you just call me? Tangzhong! Why is there a Z in the middle of this word? Focusing. It’s basically a roux, made from boiling milk (or water) and bread flour. It is what gives this bread it’s texture and without it, well, it obviously would not be the same. It’s a strange concept, I won’t lie, adding this milky looking paste to your ingredients. But interestingly enough…it works.

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Makes 1 loaf

Ingredients:

Tangzhong:
1 cup milk (I used 2%)
1/3 cup bread flour

Bread:
2 3/4 cup bread flour
2 eggs
4 tablespoon sugar
4 tablespoon softened butter
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup warm milk
1 packet active yeast

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1. Combine your 1 cup milk and 1/3 cup bread flour in a pot. Mix thoroughly and put over medium high heat.
2. Constantly whisking, watch as the mixture thickens and becomes a paste. It will be the consistency of tomato paste (I literally could not think of anything else that was similar right now). Essentially, you should be able to whisk the mixture and leave swirls.
3. Turn off and let cool.

Now for the next few steps, I did everything by hand since I don’t have a standing mixer. If you do choose to use a standing mixer, take step 1 and place in the bowl with the dough hook. Take your milk, egg, tangzhong (etc), mixture and add with the softened butter. Let the machine knead for at least 5 minutes, until the dough looks less lumpy and more elastic. Move onto step 6.

1. Combine your flour and salt in a big bowl. Set aside.
2. Combine your milk, sugar, and yeast and let proof for a few minutes, until foamy.
3. Add 1/2 of your tangzhong and 1 egg to your milk mixture. Mix.
4. Take your liquid mixture and add to your flour mixture with the butter. Mix thoroughly until the doughy is shaggy.
5. Dump your mixture onto a clean surface and start kneading; this will take at least 5 minutes until it is smooth and elastic.
6. Place in a large bowl, cover loosely with either a towel or saran wrap, and let sit in a warm place for 1 hour, or until doubled in size.
7. Take your dough and cut into 4 even pieces.
8. One piece at a time, roll out the dough into a long oval.
9. Taking the two long ends, fold them into the center of the dough (into thirds).
10. Roll lightly to flatten the folded ends.
11. Roll from one long end (with smooth side out) and set aside. Repeat with remaining 3 pieces of dough.
12. Place all four pieces in a loaf pan with the seams down. Let rise for 45 minutes.
13. Preheat your oven to 345 degreesF.
14. Make an egg wash (if desired) by mixing the remaining egg and 1/4 cup milk. Brush lightly on top of the risen dough.
15. Bake for 30 minutes.

Enjoy with some butter or jam!

Extras: if you only have a conventional oven, I suggest lowering the heat slightly and/or covering the bread with foil for at least half the baking time so it won’t brown too much.

I’ve seen plenty of recipes use all purpose flour so if you are unable to find bread flour, you should be okay!

The remaining tangzhong can be used for up to 3 days.

 

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Stir Fry Noodles & Shrimp

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Not sure what to call these. It’s basically pad see ew, but by habit I call it thai noodles or pad thai (which I know, the following recipe is nothing like pad thai). But either way, it’s an easy dinner to make and it tastes awesome.

Ingredients are super simple: rice noodles (any variety, thin, wide, etc.), any vegetables of your liking, garlic, and my soy sauce reduction.

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I thought of the soy sauce reduction when I kept reading that dark soy sauce was needed for the proper noodles. But do I have access to dark soy sauce here in Pensacola? Absolutely not. It’s hard enough to find regular soy sauce here. So, I brainstormed and thought…dark soy sauce is basically a thicker and sweeter version of soy sauce so why not make reduction? And guess what? It worked out perfectly.

So that’s secret #1: soy sauce reduction. It’s simple. It’s brown sugar and soy sauce boiled down to a thick syrup that can be used in a variety of other dishes. I used it as a dipping sauce for my Hainan chicken. The possibilities are endless.

Secret #2: undercook your rice noodles a little bit. Through many, many attempts of making these types of noodles, I realized cooking the noodles thoroughly or just a little too much caused them to break apart in the final process of cooking. By a little bit, I mean just enough so that your noodles are al dente. The cooking process will continue in the frying pan.

Secret #3: always add your shrimp last. I can’t stand when I eat rubbery, overcooked shrimp. It’s just not how shrimp should taste. Adding the shrimp last cooks them just enough so that you don’t go barfing your brains out later, and keeps the shrimp flavorful and sweet.

It’s a great dinner to make that’s filled with vegetables and is also provides great leftovers for lunch. It was my favorite during the school year.

Serves: 3-4 people

Soy Sauce Reduction:

1. Combine 3/4 cup soy sauce and 1/2 cup brown sugar in a pot. Bring to a boil.
2. Once boiling, reduce the heat to medium and let simmer for at least 10 minutes. You want it to continue in a “rolling boil” fashion so don’t step away! Carefully stir as it boils.
3. After 10 minutes, the mixture should have thickened to maple syrup consistency (the real kind). Set aside.

Stir Fry Ingredients:

1 package rice noodles (any width is fine, I prefer the wider noodles), cooked to al dente
1/2 onion, sliced
1 bell pepper, sliced
2 cups chopped napa, cabbage
1 head broccoli, chopped
4 cloves garlic, diced
1/2 cup soy sauce reduction

1. Sauté your onion, bell pepper, and broccoli with vegetable oil (or olive) on the highest heat possible.
2. Once onions are near translucent, add cabbage.
3. Make a clearing for your garlic and add with more oil. Sauté briefly.
4. Add your cooked noodles and more vegetable oil. Sauté for a couple minutes. You will notice your noodles will become soft again as it heats up with the oil. Don’t worry if your noodles don’t completely separate at this point; they will once the soy sauce is added.
5. Add your soy sauce reduction. Carefully add bit by bit at this point as you mix; you want the noodles to be colored a deep caramel color.  Don’t make the mistake of making it far too salty.
6. Keep on high heat and mix thoroughly, allowing the liquid to evaporate. Cook for another minute.

Serve with Sriracha and enjoy!

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Couple of things:
1. You can add any other ingredients, such as green onions, mixed egg, carrots, sprouts, etc.
2. Sautéing on high heat will really make the soy sauce stick and absorb into the noodles; otherwise, you will have a soupy mess.
3. As much as you may not want to, adding a good amount of vegetable oil to coat all the noodles will really give the noodles a good texture.
4. If you don’t want to use shrimp, you can use tofu or any other meats; I just suggest cooking these in advance, separate from your vegetables and then adding it in at the end.

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Flour Tortillas

Indeed, I made flour tortillas. I can’t stand store bought tortillas. They’re chalk-like, strangely sticky, and just don’t taste right. They also have an incredibly long shelf life, which in my opinion can’t be good. Having lived in California, I was blessed to have handmade tortillas by little Mexican women. Now, I am blessed to have my tortilla supply given to me by Walmart! Not.

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These tortillas were surprisingly easy to make. When I made them the first time, I couldn’t believe I had ever eaten store bought tortillas! It really was that easy.

If you have two able hands, the following ingredients, and a frying pan, try this recipe out.

Ingredients:

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2 cups white flour
1/4 cup vegetable shortening
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 cup warm water

1. In a bowl, combine your flour, shortening, and oil, and salt.
2. Cut the shortening and oil into your flour until the mixture is coarse.
3. Start adding water gradually, while mixing.
4. Once you have formed a shaggy dough, turn onto the counter and knead until smooth and elastic. This will take several minutes.
5. Once done kneading, cover loosely with saran wrap and let sit for 1 hour.
6. After 1 hour, cut your dough into golf sized pieces.
7. Heat up your frying pan over medium high heat.
8. Roll out the dough as thin as a normal tortilla (the thinner, the better in my opinion).
9. Toss onto the pan and let cook. It will start expanding.
10. Flip your tortilla after about 20 seconds (or until brown spots appear) and cook the other side.
11. Take a towel and keep your finished tortillas inside to keep warm.

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Spanish Rice

Mexican food is a must in our home. Having lived in San Diego and Los Angeles, we had endless options of Mexican restaurants to choose from. Pensacola? Not so much.

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But regardless of what we have here in Pensacola, I truly enjoy making Mexican food. Rather, I should say “Mexican” food. One absolute necessity for a Mexican meal is Spanish rice.

The rice is a blend of tomato, onions, and hints of spice. It perfectly compliments any main Mexican dish and is easy to make.

Ingredients:

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1 cup white long grain rice
1.5 cups chicken broth
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1/4 teaspoon turmeric
1/3 cup chopped onion

1. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a pot over medium heat. Add rice.
2. Stir the rice and cook until toasted brown (a few minutes).
3. Add onions. Stir and cook for 2 minutes.
4. Add turmeric. Stir.
5. Immediately add chicken broth and tomato paste. Stir well.
6. Let simmer on low heat until rice is thoroughly cooked and fluffy (at least 10 minutes).

Serve with any Mexican dish!

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Roasted Butternut Squash & Garlic Ravioli

Oh my god. Preparing this meal took forever. Hours of preparation and we literally ate it in less than 20 minutes. Oh well.

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It was worth it though. The rich and savory butternut squash complemented by slow roasted garlic, covered in browned butter with sage was perfect.

I warn you though. This requires a few hours of your day. And lots of arm power.

I’ve always been a fan of handmade pasta. Raviolis, fettuccine, gnocchi, all of it. But it’s tough to make. In a sense. Not having a pasta roller was the hardest part, meaning I hand rolled the pasta dough. With my handy $3 rolling pin from Walmart, I was able to roll out the dough to be paper thin…while brushing away bits of wood falling off of the pin. Too much pressure for it, I suppose.

Slow roasting the garlic was the key component to this rich ravioli. The garlic becomes sweet and loses it’s pungency, making it a great background flavor to the butternut squash.

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If you’re daring, try this recipe out.

Ingredients:

Filling:
1 small butternut squash, halved and seeded
3 large garlic cloves, skins on
1/2 teaspoon sage powder (or fresh sage, finely sliced)

1. Halve your squash, hollow it out and drizzle olive oil all over.
2. Place on parchment paper (on baking sheet) cut side down and roast at 400 degrees F for 40 minutes.
3. Place your garlic cloves in the oven as well.
4. When done roasting, scoop out the flesh of the squash into a food processor (or blender) along with the peeled roasted garlic and sage powder. Puree and let cool.

Dough:
3 eggs
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon salt

1. Make a large mound with your flour and create a well.
2. Add your remaining ingredients.
3. Start mixing the eggs, slowly adding in the flour.
4. You will probably experience an explosion of egg flowing uncontrollably at some point. Don’t worry, just keep mixing and combining the ingredients. If your dough is still too wet, add more flour. Add more water if it is too dry to knead.
5. Once flour has been incorporated, start kneading. Knead for 10 minutes.
6. The dough will become smooth and elastic. Once you are at this point, cut into 2 parts and wrap lightly with saran wrap. Let sit at room temperature for 1 hour.

Sauce:
3 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon sage powder (or fresh sage, sliced thin)

1. Place the butter in a saucepan and let simmer over medium high heat.
2. Once butter has browned, add sage. Pour onto cooked ravioli.

Assembling the ravioli:

1. If you have a pasta roller, then you probably don’t need further instructions.
2. If you’re like me, get your rolling pin out and start rolling the dough. You want to keep it log shaped.
3. Roll until paper thin (this will take a while). Do the same to your other piece of dough.
4. Place 1.5 tablespoon of filling on the dough, separating at least 1 inch apart.
5. With water, wet the areas around the filling.
6. Take the other sheet of rolled out dough and place carefully on top of the filling(s).
7. Starting from the bottom, start carefully sticking the two pieces of dough together between the filling. You want to avoid any air bubbles so move upward slowly.
8. With a sharp knife, pastry scraper, or any other tool you have, cut your ravioli carefully into squares. If you’d like, you can make them circular. Make sure they are well sealed!
9. Place your ravioli on parchment paper.
10. After 20 minutes, flip your raviolis over and let sit for another 25 minutes.
11. To cook, place your ravioli in boiling water for 4-5 minutes.
12. Pour the browned butter onto your ravioli and enjoy!

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Rosemary Focaccia

Bread is my worst enemy. But a delicious one.

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I remember always going to my favorite Italian deli during high school and getting focaccia bread. It was fluffy, chewy, and had a variety of toppings. My favorite was olives and tomatoes.

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Homemade ravioli is on the menu tonight, so I thought it was a perfect opportunity to make this bread on a rainy Sunday. We have an abundance (I mean TONS) of rosemary growing outside so I took advantage.

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Ingredients:

1.5 cups hot water
3 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon honey
1 packet yeast
2+ cups flour
1 large sprig of rosemary

1. Refer to my bagel recipe for the dough: https://kimchiandkogi.com/2014/07/10/bagels-i-did-it/ Keep in mind, I swapped out the bread flour for all purpose flour and molasses for honey. Molasses and honey can be interchanged with my bread recipes.
2. When your dough is done rising, have your oven heated up to 500 degrees F with your cast iron pan inside (or pizza stone).
3. Flip your dough onto a large piece of parchment paper dusted with flour. Do NOT knead the dough again.
4. I keep my dough round but you can shape it to be rectangular at this point.
5. With your thumbs, begin making dents throughout the dough.
6. Drizzle extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle your chopped rosemary onto the dough.
7. Bake for 12 minutes or until golden brown. 1 2

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Enjoy with pasta! Or with any leftover focaccia, make sandwiches!